Our Children and Educators Deserve Safety to Live, Learn, Teach, and Thrive

Our hearts are heavy with the news of the shooting in Uvalde, Texas, on Tuesday. We at the Nellie Mae Education Foundation cannot imagine the immeasurable grief facing the students, parents, educators, and community members who are mourning the loss of nineteen children and two teachers. It is not lost on us that just last week, we released a similar statement about the mass shootings in Buffalo, Dallas, and Southern California, condemning violence and calling on others to join us in our commitment to fighting for a more just, equitable future. Now, only days later, we are facing the same devastating terror and despair again.

We know that this violence is not limited to Uvalde; we remember Sandy Hook and Parkland and more. We know this violence is not limited to schools; we remember Pulse and Walmart and countless others. We know that this violence is not even limited to mass shootings — this violence is endemic to a culture that was built on white supremacy, colonization, and oppression. The violence we fear in our country is inextricably linked to the violence that fueled the genocides of Indigenous nations and the enslavement of Black people, and it is linked to the violence of imperialism that has so defined our place in the world in both the past and present. It is linked to the violence of our immigration policies, as community members in Uvalde were reminded when Border Patrol agents showed up to the school, causing worries of detainment and deportation on top of the fear for their children’s lives. Our children and educators deserve safety to live, learn, teach, and thrive.

Last week, in the wake of three mass shootings, we reaffirmed our commitment to work towards equitable and liberatory education, and to fight against white supremacy and violence. We continue to stand firm in these commitments. But it can feel hopeless to keep repeating these commitments as violence keeps occurring, keeps killing people, keeps showing us that even if we dedicate ourselves to good work, the oppressive systems we are up against are still standing strong. Today, we came together as a work community to hold space for grief, anger, fear, and pain. It was also important to start articulating how we want and need to show up, as one institution and in partnership — taking cues from those most impacted. While we don’t hold the answers, we know we must do more and intentionally align efforts with others. We are clear that silence is not an option.

It is in moments like these that we turn to words like those from Mariame Kaba about how hope is a discipline. Hope is something that grounds us in the work, that keeps us going, even when we are tired or angry or frightened. As we use our hope to fuel our response to these terrible tragedies, we encourage others to do the same. Together, let’s leverage the full power and assets of philanthropy to exert the kind of influence and pressure needed to protect our humanity and lives.

We at the Nellie Mae Education Foundation Stand with the Victims of White Supremacy and Hate Crimes

Today, and every day, we at the Nellie Mae Education Foundation hold space in our hearts for the victims of white supremacist violence. We mourn the lives of the victims of the anti-Black mass shooting at a Tops Supermarket in Buffalo. We mourn the life lost and wish healing for the survivors of the mass shooting at Geneva Presbyterian Church in Southern California. We are outraged alongside the victims of the anti-Asian shooting at Hair World Salon in Dallas. Every instance of white supremacist violence not only results in the immeasurable loss of the victims’ lives, but it also sends a clear message: we are not safe. Not in grocery stores, not in churches, not in hair salons. Not in nightclubs or at retail stores. Not in schools.

Grappling with this reality is present for all of us and even more so for Black, Brown, Indigenous, Asian, Pacific Islander, Latinx, Disabled, and LGBTQ + communities. It can be hard to find hope in the midst of it all. And we are constantly reminded that “our freedoms and liberation transcend lines of difference and geographies.

“We stand in our commitment to work alongside others who believe in teaching the truth of our past and present, who are unequivocal about naming violence, white supremacy, and racism for what they are, who support a public education system rooted in safety, justice, and love.”

The violence of white supremacy, anti-Blackness, and anti-Asian racism is not new, even if it is now more visible to some members of the population. This same violence is rooted in a form of education, indoctrination, and beliefs that promote hate, division, and oppression. We stand in our commitment to work alongside others who believe in teaching the truth of our past and present, who are unequivocal about naming violence, white supremacy, and racism for what they are, who support a public education system rooted in safety, justice, and love. Fighting for quality, liberatory, just, and equitable education necessitates that we fight against white supremacy, anti-Blackness, anti-Asian racism, and all forms of oppression and violence.

As we take time to consider how we will continue using our privilege as a Foundation to dismantle the structures of white supremacy, racism and violence that threaten the very communities and mission we support, we encourage others to do the same. We are grateful to those who are modeling the way towards a better and thriving future. May we find solidarity and healing in community as we mourn and continue to fight back against violence rooted in white supremacy.

Resources for Healing and Care

Emergent Healing | School for The Great Turning (teachable.com)

The Four Bodies: A Holistic Toolkit for Coping With Racial Trauma | by Nappy Head Club | Nappy Head Club | Medium

Radical Self Care — Learn & Unlearn: Anti-racism Resource Guide — Research Guides at School of the Art Institute of Chicago (saic.edu)

The Nap Ministry | Rest is Resistance (wordpress.com)

The Nellie Mae Education Foundation Welcomes Mishone Donelson, Senior Vice President and Senior Managing Director at Horizon Technology Finance, to Board of Directors

We are excited to announce the appointment of Mishone Donelson, Senior Vice President and Senior Managing Director at Horizon Technology Finance, to the Nellie Mae Education Foundation Board of Directors. As a board member, Mishone’s expertise and experience in equitable finance and education will guide the Foundation on our racial equity journey.

“Mishone joins us at a critical time when much of philanthropy is thinking about how to leverage assets towards purpose and mission,” said Nellie Mae interim president & CEO, Dr. Gislaine Ngounou. “We are thrilled and grateful that he has chosen to bring his experiences, knowledge, and skills to the important work of the Foundation so that we can better advance racial justice in public education.”

“Mishone combines outstanding business experience with a long track record of supporting educational opportunity and equity. He will be a tremendous partner in moving Nellie Mae’s mission forward,” said Greg Gunn, chair of the Nellie Mae Board.

Mishone has nearly 20 years of investment and business development experience, and currently serves as a Senior Vice President and Senior Managing Director at Horizon Technology Finance, a leading venture lending firm. He is responsible for sourcing investment opportunities in the life sciences and healthcare technology markets.

“I am honored and excited to join the board of the Nellie Mae Education Foundation,” said Mishone Donelson. “As a product of the public school system, I understand first-hand the value and challenges of the public educational system. I want to help ensure that young people of color in the New England area have the quality public education that they need and deserve.”

Previously, Mishone was a Principal at Fairview Capital Partners, where he led investment and business development efforts for Fairview’s venture capital, private equity, and direct co-investment portfolios. Prior to that, Mishone served at Ariel Investments as an equity research analyst and as Chief of Staff to the Chairman and CEO. He also formerly served as a consultant for Accenture. Mishone also helped launch the Memphis Academy of Science and Engineering, Tennessee’s first charter school.

Mishone currently also serves as a board member for Hartford Youth Scholars and the Connecticut Airport Authority, and as a trustee for Miss Porter’s School.

Mishone earned a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering from MIT and a Master of Business Administration from the Kellogg School of Management, where he was a Robert Toigo Fellow.

Announcing New Grant Commitments

Photo by Alexander Suhorucov from Pexels

Today, on the heels of the start of the first in-person school year for many in over 18 months, we are thrilled to announce grant commitments to organizations that continue the work of advancing racial equity in our public education system. We are pleased to announce new grant commitments to organizations as part of our Supporting Organizations Led by People of Color and Advancing Community School Partnerships grant funds.

Supporting Organizations Led by People of Color

We believe that organizations led by people of color are in the best position to organize and lift up the invaluable voices of students, families, and communities who have been traditionally excluded from decisions made about their schools. These organizations are advocating for racial equity in New England schools, such as: implementing culturally responsive teaching and learning; diversifying the teacher workforce; establishing restorative justice practices in schools; and wraparound services and supports for children, youth, and families.

Advancing Community-School Partnerships

Additionally, at the Nellie Mae Education Foundation, we believe that when schools work in partnership with community-based organizations, students are better positioned to receive the community supports they need to thrive. We know that when community members are welcomed into the school environment and play a key role in decision-making, all young people benefit. Today, we are also pleased to announce grants as a part of our Advancing Community-School Partnerships fund, aimed at supporting community-driven partnerships between districts and their communities to advance racial equity and excellent, student-centered public education.

Welcoming Our New Community Advisors — 2021

 
Nellie Mae Ed. Fdn.
Aug 25 · 4 min read

In 2019, we launched our first Community Advisory Group — a group of individuals with deep relationships and networks in the communities they serve — to provide perspective and insight on our grantmaking strategy and implementation. Since that time, our advisors have served as invaluable partners in the creation and implementation of our grantmaking strategy focused on advancing racial equity in public education. Each step of the way, they have offered critical insight, feedback, and perspective on how to show up as engaged and supportive funders in this space.

This summer, we are pleased to welcome six new youth advisors to the Community Advisory Group, and know that they will continue to play a key role in moving our work ahead:

Micaela (Mica) Arenas (she/her/hers): Mica is a sophomore at Manchester High School in Connecticut and, in addition to serving on the Nellie Mae Community Advisory Group, is a member of her district’s Youth Equity Squad. Mica is an aspiring author who enjoys reading, playing soccer, watching old musicals, and spending time with her parents and older brother. She believes in the power of words to change the world.

Davyon Clark (he/him/his): Dayvon is a young Black youth leader who is a sophomore at Manchester High School in Connecticut. After high school, he plans on pursuing his next steps in college and is hoping to play sports and major in some type of business management. In his free time, you can find him on the football field or the basketball court! His favorite class in school is math, and has experience participating in his school’s Youth Equity Squad — a safe space for talking and building relationships with others.

Gabrielle Oulette (she/her/hers): A junior at Blackstone Academy Charter School, and a youth leader at the Alliance of Rhode Island Southeast Asians for Education (ARISE) in Providence, Rhode Island, Gabrielle is an active member of her community and continues to seek change within herself and the world around her. She calls Pawtucket home and loves nature, animals, food, laughing, and being around loved ones.

Dara Song (she/her/hers): An incoming senior at Manchester High School in Connecticut, Dara is involved in her school’s student leadership body, tennis and volleyball teams, mental health club, and town youth commission. Dara is hoping to attend a four-year college after graduation.

 

Naomi Felix Monanci (she/her/hers): Naomi is a Dominican-American youth leader at the Alliance of Rhode Island Southeast Asians for Education (ARISE) in Providence, Rhode Island. Naomi attends Highlander Charter School, and in her free time you can find her singing at her church and doing pantomime! She is passionate about combatting social injustices happening in the world and aspires to be an engineer.

Khaiya Proeung (she/her/hers): Khaiya Proeung isa Khmer-American student attending Cranston High School East in Rhode Island. Khaiya is a youth leader with the Alliance of Southeast Asians for Education (ARISE) and has been surrounded by activism throughout her life. Khaiya continues to strive towards her passion for activism in her daily life and has a passion for cosmetology and skin care!

Announcing our 2021 Speakers Bureau

 
Nellie Mae Ed. Fdn.
Aug 9 · 3 min read
For the past several years, Nellie Mae Education Foundation has welcomed a new cohort of education leaders into our Speakers Bureau. After a year and a half characterized by the twin pandemics of COVID-19 and systemic racism, and where our schools were forced to rethink where, when, and how learning happens, we are thrilled to welcome our newest cohort of Nellie Mae Education Foundation Speakers Bureau members committed to advancing racial equity in our public education system.

This year’s cohort brings together a group of experts from across the region who are united in their quest to create an equitable education system for all. Education has been thrust into the political spotlight as opponents of equity are working overtime to hinder the ability of our nation’s children to learn the truth about the nation’s founding, as well as ask the critical questions about how we can close the opportunity gaps that have been created and reinforced over the decades.

Our new cohort includes administrators, non-profit leaders, students, teachers, family advocates and more. These leaders recognize that schools can’t begin to educate our youth without creating environments where students feel seen, known, and empowered. We have long realized that schools are about much more than teaching or leading specific subject matters or helping students perform proficiently on tests. They are also about creating the global citizens of tomorrow and shaping a more just and equitable future for all of us

We couldn’t be more excited about this new cohort and the passion, expertise, and fortitude they will bring to the education ecosystem over the course of their time with us. Please see the list of our new Speakers Bureau members below:

Book a speaker for an upcoming event by visiting our Speakers Bureau site!

In Memoriam: Dudley Williams

Nellie Mae Ed. Fdn.

May 24 · 1 min read
Dudley Williams at the Foundation’s Lawrence W. O’Toole Awards Ceremony in 2012

Our hearts are heavy as we mourn the passing of Dudley Williams, former Board Chair of the Nellie Mae Education Foundation. In his 12 years of service at the organization, Dudley was instrumental in shaping the foundation’s direction in rethinking how, when, and where learning happened. He dedicated his life to the service of others, especially in the Stamford, Connecticut community and public school system. In addition to the long list of his accomplishments and public service, Dudley’s graciousness, intelligence, and care was visible in everything he did. We are all better for having known him and are holding his family in our hearts.

The Nellie Mae Education Foundation Appoints Dr. Gislaine N. Ngounou, Ed. L.D., as Interim President and CEO

Dr. Ngounou to bring nearly two decades of experience in the education and nonprofit space to the role

Nellie Mae Ed. Fdn.
May 20 · 4 min read

Quincy, MA — May 20, 2021: The Nellie Mae Education Foundation Board of Directors, in consultation with outgoing President and CEO Nick Donohue, has appointed Dr. Gislaine N. Ngounou, Ed. L.D., as Interim President and CEO, effective June 1, 2021. The organization is thrilled to name Dr. Ngounou to this elevated leadership role, and is confident that she will continue to build on the solid foundation that she, along with Foundation colleagues, advisors, and grantees, has set. The Nellie Mae Education Foundation expects Dr. Ngounou to remain in the interim role for 6–12 months as they pause their external search while taking time to determine next steps around decisions of future, permanent leadership of the organization.

I feel confident that I am well-equipped to lead and support the organization through this transition. I look forward to continuing to work in partnership with our Board, Nellie Mae colleagues, community advisors, and grantee partners to continue to move the Foundation’s work forward, so that we may use our power and privilege as an organization to uproot systemic racism. — Dr. Ngounou,Vice President, Strategy and Programs, Nellie Mae Education Foundation

When Dr. Ngounou takes on the position of Interim President and CEO on June 1, she will bring nearly two decades of experience working across the education sector, including work with nonprofits, individual schools, and school districts. Most recently, she served as the Foundation’s Vice President of Strategy and Programs, where she was responsible for successfully implementing the organization’s new grantmaking strategy focused on advancing racial equity in public education. Before coming to the Foundation, Dr. Ngounou served as the Chief Program Officer for Arlington, Virginia-based Phi Delta Kappa International, a professional organization for educators. In this role, she designed and led programs that supported school district leaders, provided leadership coaching surrounding issues of equity and social justice, and created and facilitated an ongoing community that allowed system-level leaders in districts from across the country to learn from one another. Prior to her work at Phi Delta Kappa, Dr. Ngounou worked for school districts including Hartford Public Schools, Montgomery County Public Schools, and the Kansas City Missouri School District. She is passionate about social justice, racial equity, adult learning, youth and community empowerment, systems change, and increasing educational access and opportunities for all students to thrive.

I speak on behalf of the entire Nellie Mae Board of Directors when I say that we are more than excited to have Gislaine in the Interim President and CEO role. — Greg Gunn, Chair, Nellie Mae Education Foundation Board of Directors

“I am excited and thankful for this opportunity, and feel confident that I am well-equipped and positioned to lead and support the organization through this transition,” said Dr. Ngounou. “I look forward to continuing to work in partnership with our Board, Nellie Mae colleagues, community advisors, and grantee partners to continue to move the Foundation’s work forward, so that we may use our power and privilege as an organization to uproot systemic racism — both within philanthropy and our public education system. I hope we can continue to advance a philanthropic practice that centers the voices of those most impacted by injustices.”

“I speak on behalf of the entire Nellie Mae Board of Directors when I say that we are more than excited to have Gislaine in the Interim President and CEO role,” said Greg Gunn, Chair of the Nellie Mae Education Foundation Board of Directors. “We are confident that this move will allow her to continue to move the organization forward in advancing a vision where all young people have access to an excellent and equitable public education that prepares them to succeed and thrive in community. Additionally, this move will allow the organization to continue implementing its current grantmaking strategy uninterrupted.”

Outgoing President and CEO Nick Donohue plans to transition out of the organization effective May 31, 2021, after over 14 years at the organization. The Foundation remains ever grateful for Nick’s exemplary leadership over the years. “Nick’s guidance and expertise has pushed us to more deeply engage in racial equity work as a foundation, which in turn has made us a much more responsive grantmaker,” said Greg Gunn. “He has been responsible for shepherding in student-centered approaches to learning as a national education reform strategy, and really helping to shift the narrative around how people think about the ways schools should be organized to best serve young people. We know Nick’s legacy will be carried out as we continue our work, and we wish him the best in his future endeavors.”

Gislaine brings strategic vision, deep knowledge around education, extensive experience with racial equity and change management, that will bring so much to advancing the organization’s vision. It is because of her leadership and execution that the Foundation has been able to implement our new grantmaking strategy with thoughtfulness, humility, and care. — Nick Donohue, Outgoing Nellie Mae Education Foundation President and CEO

“While I will miss working closely with Nellie Mae colleagues, partners, and grantees, I couldn’t be more thrilled for Gislaine and the organization about this decision,” said Nick Donohue. “Gislaine brings strategic vision, deep knowledge around education, extensive experience with racial equity and change management, and an inspiring leadership style that will bring so much to advancing the organization’s vision. It is because of her leadership and execution that the Foundation has been able to implement our new grantmaking strategy with thoughtfulness, humility, and care. It has been the privilege and honor of my lifetime to work at the Nellie Mae Education Foundation, and I look forward to watching how the organization grows even more under her full leadership.”

Cross-Racial Healing and Solidarity in a White Supremacist World

Written by Alexis Harewood and Ellen Wang

Central to the Nellie Mae Education Foundation’s focus of advancing racial equity in public education is our commitment to ensuring all young people and families feel safe in schools and communities across New England as school buildings continue to reopen. When young people experience belonging and emotional safety by feeling that their perspectives, needs and full identities are seen and embraced, they can focus on learning and thrive academically (Darling-Hammond, 2017).

Since the Foundation released the Racism is a Virus, Too Rapid Response Fund in March of 2020, over 500,000 people in the United States have died from COVID-19. The virus has disproportionately impacted the Black, Indigenous, Latinx, and Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities. While Asian American racism did not start with COVID-19, the spread of the virus has prompted the rise of anti-Asian racism and xenophobia through the U.S., “taking the forms of vandalism, student bullying, online hate speech, and more recently, violent attacks against elders. This type of ‘othering’ divides communities by dehumanizing groups of people when anxiety is manipulated and misdirected to place blame in the time of crisis” (Smithsonian APA Center).

Photo by Guillaume Issaly on Unsplash

AAPI communities have a deep-rooted history of being in solidarity with other communities of color — something that is often left unspoken. There is a vast history of AAPI communities supporting Black communities in the United States including during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. Activists like Yuri Kochiyama, Grace Lee Boggs, Richard Aoki, and Larry Itliong were constant advocates for Black and Brown liberation and worked closely alongside Black and Brown people.

After the murders of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd by police officers in 2020, AAPI communities across the world showed up in solidarity with Black communities to demand policy change. ASIANS 4 BLACK LIVES signs, actions, and sentiments continue to be in profound allyship and solidarity with Black people.

Two of our program officers leading this work reflect on what cross-racial solidarity means to them, as women of color.

Reflections from Alexis Harewood, program officer

Last year brought me countless moments of sadness and grief after the murders of Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, and so many others. Yet there were innumerable acts of solidarity that filled me with hope. As a Black woman, it meant a lot to see and hear that other non-Black people of color recognized that the ‘issue’ being fought wasn’t Black people standing against the police, but the suppressed standing up and fighting against white supremacy in all of its many forms. Moreover, it was liberating to see people working to expose how anti-Blackness shows up in their racial groups and fighting racism with solidarity as one of my favorite activists, Fred Hampton, did.

White supremacy has deeply impacted communities of color. White supremacy has created competition and harm within racial groups. But harm means there is also opportunity for healing.

I recognize that while Black communities grieved these murders, AAPI communities around the world were also grieving and fearing for the physical safety and emotional well-being of themselves and their elders. They fought a silent war that had yet to be fully detailed or reported by the mainstream media. Yet, they showed up and held Black people closely and remained in solidarity.

Reflections from Ellen Wang, senior program officer

As an East Asian woman working in philanthropy, I am incredibly grateful to be doing this work alongside my colleagues in the philanthropic sector. I am especially moved to do this work in solidarity with my colleague and dear friend, Alexis Harewood. Doing this work alongside a brilliant Black woman and my other colleagues at Nellie Mae, has been a tangible way for me to heal and work through my own anger and grief.

Healing can only begin to happen when we stop long enough to listen deeply to each other, acknowledge the harms we have caused one another, and understand that it is white supremacy that has pitted us against each other and that of which must be dismantled.

I want to be clear that while AAPIs are being targeted now during the pandemic, anti-Asian racism and violence, Sinophobia, and xenophobia are nothing new. They are interwoven into the fabric of this country. Healing can only begin to happen when we stop long enough to listen deeply to each other, acknowledge the harms we have caused one another, and understand that it is white supremacy that has pitted us against each other and that of which must be dismantled.

My hope is that this funding opportunity will continue to support those who have been doing the work of promoting cross-community solidarity, and serve as a stepping point for those we are ready to embark on the hard work of building deep, sustained bridges. I fundamentally believe that our liberation is bound together and showing up for one another cannot be transactional, but a life-long commitment.

*The first part of this blog post is an excerpt from Cross-Racial Healing and Solidarity in a White Supremacist World Rapid Response Grant


Cross-Racial Healing and Solidarity in a White Supremacist World was originally published in Nellie Mae Education Foundation on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

The Nellie Mae Education Foundation Welcomes United We Dream Co-Founder Cristina Jiménez Moreta to…

The Nellie Mae Education Foundation Welcomes United We Dream Co-Founder Cristina Jiménez Moreta to Board of Directors

Today, we are thrilled to announce the appointment of Cristina Jiménez Moreta, co-founder and former executive director of United We Dream, the country’s largest immigrant-youth-led network, to the Nellie Mae Education Foundation Board of Directors. As a new member of the board, Cristina’s leadership and extensive experience in community organizing will aid the Foundation in advancing racial equity in public education.

“We are honored to welcome her to our Board of Directors as we continue to fight for racial equity and equal access to excellent public education for all students in New England.” — Nick Donohue

“Cristina has been a powerful force in the immigrant justice movement, empowering and organizing young people and communities of color across the country for over a decade,” Nick Donohue, President and CEO of Nellie Mae said. “We are honored to welcome her to our Board of Directors as we continue to fight for racial equity and equal access to excellent public education for all students in New England.”

“The Nellie Mae Board of Directors is thrilled to have Cristina joining us,” said Greg Gunn, chair of the Nellie Mae Board. “Cristina brings unmatched experience in movement and coalition building, community organizing, and public policy that will support the foundation in moving its agenda forward.”

Cristina is a nationally recognized organizer and movement strategist who has been instrumental in building a sustained and influential youth-led immigrant movement. In recognition of her work as a social justice organizer, Cristina received a 2017 MacArthur Fellowship, the Four Freedoms Award, and a spot on the 2018 TIME 100 List. She has been celebrated in various lists including “Forbes 30 under 30 in Law and Policy” and the Chronicle of Philanthropy’s “40 under 40 Young Leaders Who are Solving Problems of Today and Tomorrow.”

“In communities across New England, courageous young people are driving the change they want to see. I am thrilled to support them and continue the fight for a more just future for all young people with the Nellie Mae Education Foundation.” — Cristina Jiménez Moreta

“Young people of color are facing unprecedented challenges, and the work of advancing racial equity in public education has never been more critical,” said Cristina Jiménez Moreta. “In communities across New England, courageous young people are driving the change they want to see. I am thrilled to support them and continue the fight for a more just future for all young people with the Nellie Mae Education Foundation.”

Cristina co-founded United We Dream (UWD), the largest immigrant youth-led organization in the country. Under Cristina’s leadership as Executive Director, UWD has grown into a powerful network of nearly one million members and has played a pivotal role in shifting the policy conversation and narrative about immigrants and immigration, ultimately influencing policy. Cristina was instrumental in UWD’s successful campaign for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. She migrated to the U.S from Ecuador with her family at the age of 13, growing up undocumented.

In recognition of her work as a social justice organizer, Cristina received a 2017 MacArthur Fellowship, the Four Freedoms Award, and a spot on the 2018 TIME 100 List. Cristina has appeared in hundreds of national and local media outlets including USA Today, CNN, MSNBC, HBO, The New York Times, the LA Times, ABC, NPR, The Huffington Post, Univision, Telemundo, and La Opinion. Her writing has been published in the New York Times, CNN, USA Today, Huffington Post, and El Diario.

Cristina proudly serves on the Board of Directors of the National Committee for Responsible Philanthropy (NCRP), Hazen Foundation, and Make the Road Action Fund. Cristina also co-founded the New York State Youth Leadership Council, the Dream Mentorship Program at Queens College, was an immigration policy analyst for the Drum Major Institute for Public Policy and an immigrant rights organizer at Make the Road New York.

Cristina holds a Master’s degree in Public Administration & Public Policy from the School of Public of Affairs at Baruch College, CUNY and graduated Cum Laude with a B.A. in Political Science and Business from Queens College, CUNY. She was awarded an Honorary Doctorate Degree in Letters & Humanities by Wesleyan University.


The Nellie Mae Education Foundation Welcomes United We Dream Co-Founder Cristina Jiménez Moreta to… was originally published in Nellie Mae Education Foundation on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.